Curation and the Classroom : a Journey

Curation has been on my mind a lot these holidays….actually, a lot longer than that really.

It’s been a long time since 2008 and first using Delicious with my students but it has been only 12 months since my introduction to Social Media as I now use it in my teaching and learning life. These two great presentations below have had me thinking about goals for the coming year.

I use and enjoy a variety of tools to curate the web and all for different purposes e.g Livebinders, Diigo,  Symbaloo, the Edmodo library. As with all things , it’s the purpose and not the tool that drive the choice and of course my learning evolution.

SymbalooEDU  is one of my favourite tools . I have been using it for about a year now to create and share Webmixes of links with my team, my PLN, my students and to curate topics for classroom learning. A major focus in late 2010/2011 was in Stage 6. Similar to the teachers in this post from the Symbaloo Blog I have used Symbaloo to encourage digital citizenship, digital scholarship, personal learning environments and the use of Web 2 in my Faculty  and School.

Our annual Study and Work Skills Day in Term One 2011 incorporated a section on Digital Study Skills . This day is designed for the context of our school, where students have many learning pathways and undertake a variety of school to work programs and traineeships. It needs to be understood that the program was developed in accordance with school values .

Inspired by Pip Cleaves and the DER Study Skills Weebly  , I created a Diigo list of tools for students to explore and they created their own Symbaloo. We colour coded our tiles to suit the nature of the tool. e.g Reference, Study Aid. A colleague then created a Study and Work Skills Blog for students so that their learning from the day was accessible. The students responded positively to this and  depending on the Faculty they are learning in, have used it to varying degrees.  On reflection, a session like this would also be really valuable for Year 10 in term 4 and a few staff have already suggested this. Some staff have incorporated Symbaloo into their classrooms or digital work life. As with any new process , sustainability and expectations go hand in hand. I have made it a part of my classroom experience in History  and  English  ( in process of much needed update so this one not shared with students yet)  and encouraged students to create their own. I like Symbaloo for the continuity of  the PLE concept in action for our students.

In our Faculty both the Edmodo library and Sqworl  are also used for curation by teachers with students 9-12. We need to focus on increasing expectations for individual student use and creation. We need to focus on scholarship. This is a goal for the coming year, the process has begun ; it just needs to be embedded more deeply within our Faculty pedagogy.

Recently (better late than never) I have been exploring Scoop.it and how this tool can be used to create “textbooks” for classroom topics e.g.  Conflict in Indochina : 1954-1979   or for my own learning History and Geography in the 21st Century Classroom  ( not sure that I like this title but that’s another story ).

Another great use for Scoop.it is student research.

Here is a great post from the Unquiet Librarian on this A Senior Shares Why she is falling in love with Scoop.it 

In my history classroom, reflection on research process, planning and source evaluation has been a focus for a while. Keeping this manageable, relevant and within the syllabus expectations is the challenge. The use of bookmarking and sites like Diigo needs to be taken further. The document below shows a process that we use, as part of meeting outcomes in research and inquiry in our research tasks but it really needs revising for the “21st Century” ( there goes that expression again ! )

and yes……while it may seem strange that Edmodo sits side by side with Fax as a way to communicate with sources in this document, a reality of life in the bush is that for some students, this is still a method of communication in their home. It’s there with equity in mind.

I think Scoop.it could be a tool students use next term to curate their research for a topic and help in revitalising the process above. I have been out of the classroom for almost a term and it feels like a lot longer ! New goals are always good and aspects of the NSW Syllabus under the National Curriculum are ripe for this.

Thanks for the thinking PLN  !

P.S Especially you : @pipcleaves and @heyjudeonline in OZ.

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4 Responses to Curation and the Classroom : a Journey

  1. bhewes says:

    Wow – this is awesome. Nice post. i really have to do this. My brain is swimming, I need someone like you at my school :)
    Gratz.

  2. carlaleeb says:

    Thanks Bianca, I take that as a high compliment from you but I think you are doing a great job leading your school :) . I don’t share enough via my Blog on my actual teaching practice and I really should. Just saw a great typo in the docs too :(. Thanks for stopping by.

  3. ritasili says:

    Thank you for your research and your own experience, I really like what you wrote and resources you offer. I work in a documentation center and the content curation is very important. I working primarily with teachers in training projects and experiments. I believe that I will use your suggestions.

    (Sorry for my English. I’m Italian and I used Google translator)

    • carlaleeb says:

      Hi Rita, thanks for your kind words and I am glad that you enjoyed the post. Google translate is a fantastic tool isn’t it ! It has been an interesting learning journey and I am looking forward to taking it further in the next year.There are some great resources on scoop.it for curation and all of the educators who have influenced me in this post are on Twitter, have Blogs or Slideshare presentations. They should be easy to find on the Web .Let me know if you can’t. Enjoy your week :)

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